Jewish Holidays and Rituals

Calendar of Jewish Holidays

Baby-naming Ceremonies
Simchat Bat
Traditionally, the Simchat Bat ceremony for baby girls, takes place in the synagogue on the first Shabbat following her birth. During the ceremony, either the father or both parents are called to the Torah for a reading and blessing.  Today, many families choose to have the ceremonies in their own homes.

Bar/Bat Mitzvah
The Bar/Bat Mitzvah celebrates a young person's entry into the adult Jewish community. Although these observances are not prescribed by written law, they have become important religious traditions over the last 450 years. Typically, during the celebration, the young person recites a blessing over the Torah, reads the Haftorah or Torah portion for that week and then offers a speech or scholarly comment.

Further reading:


Birth
Brit Milah (Circumcision)
Traditionally, a Jewish baby boy has a circumcision or brit milah on his eighth day of life, provided there are no medical reasons for delaying. A mohel should be contacted as soon as possible after birth in order to set the correct date and time for the brit.

Local Mohels:


Divorce
Although Judaism does not encourage divorce as a solution to marital problems, it recognizes that, when it is impossible fora couple to continue living together as man and wife, a divorce should be offered with as few obstacles as possible. Most Jewish individuals prefer to obtain a religious divorce, a get, from a rabbinical council Bet Din, in addition to a civil divorce. To acquire a get, the couple appears before a Bet Din, a rabbinical court consisting of three rabbis. Most Batei Din will not permit a divorce unless a civil divorce has already been completed. For more information please contact your rabbi.


Funeral Home
Louis Memorial Chapel
6830 Troost Ave.
Kansas City, Missouri 64131
816.361.5211
  
The Louis Memorial Chapel is Greater Kansas City's ony Jewish funeral home in business since 1916.


Louis Memorial Chapel meets the needs of all of the families they serve, from the most traditional Orthodox Jewish service to a contemporary ceremony. They listen to and respect the wishes of the families they serve. They are equipped to adhere to all Jewish law and are dedicated to preserving the dignity and sanctity of the funeral.

Services Offered:

  • Chapel Services
  • Synagogue Services
  • Graveside Services
  • Out of Town Transfers
  • Cremation Services

Further reading:


Marriage
The marriage ceremony is a simcha, celebrating the union between two Jewish individuals. The ceremony takes place under a chuppah, or canopy, and the actual marriage involves exchanging wedding rings while the couple (or just the groom in some congregations) recites the following:"Behold thou art sanctified unto me by this ring according to the law of Moses and Israel."

Further reading:


Mikvaot
According to tradition, the
mikvah, a ritual cleansing bath, is one of the oldest practices in Jewish life. The mikvah is said to endow marital relations with a special religious significance. In Orthodox practice, the wife must immerse herself in the mikvah monthly following her menstrual cycle in order to resume marital relations. Similarly, the mikvah is used when an individual converts to Judaism, celebrating the person's new life as a Jew.

Kansas City has two mikvaot:





 
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